Prerecorded AiS Lesson Videos

On this page you will find several video lessons to show or assign to students participating in Architects in Schools. We suggest you start with a video from the “Intro to Architecture” section and then follow up with videos from the “Application of Architectural Concepts” section. The videos in the “Application of Architectural Concepts” section serve as a great foundation for hands-on projects that can be completed from home or in the classroom.

You will be able to share the following video links directly with students if you are assigning them to be watched on their own time. You can also use the links to play the videos for the class as a whole, whether you do so virtually or in the classroom. Closed captioning is available on all of the videos. Please do not share the video links with non-AiS participants.

If you have any questions about how to assign or implement the following videos into classroom curriculum, please contact Kim Knowles, kim@af-oregon.org.

Intro to Architecture

The following lessons and videos serve as a great introduction to the world of architecture and design. They are intended to be shown or assigned to students first, before you move into more complex architectural concepts and assignments.

For teachers who are not partnering with a design/building professional or are doing a limited amount of sessions with them, we suggest you show or assign one of the following videos before or after the students’ first session with the professional.

Expand the titles below to access each video lesson and pertinent information.

Featuring Alison Hoagland, Architect at Mackenzie in Portland, Oregon.

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/LmaHi2sAySY
Video length: 13:13
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn about the role and job of architects and engineers
  • To understand the importance of teamwork when it comes to designing and building places
  • To learn about the design process: ask, imagine, plan, create then improve
  • To briefly learn about the process of becoming a licensed architect
  • To see an example of where architects work
  • To notice how design is all around us

Activity/Assignment: This video includes the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: 2.34: What Do I See Through My Telescope? Students are asked to create a telescope, look around their space and draw the details they find.

Materials Required:

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • If students are watching this from home and are not able to print a copy of the drawing grid, make sure they have instructions to draw their own grid.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their drawings and what they found with the rest of the class.

Extension: Have students repeat the telescope activity in another space, e.g. on a neighborhood walk

Featuring Ed Herrera, Architect and Amy Friendy, Principal Owner at BRIC Architecture in Portland, Oregon.

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/8eVP9ji6pOY
Video length: 10:25
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To notice how design is all around us
  • To be able to identify the different elements of design
  • To begin to notice the elements of design in their everyday life
  • To see an example of where architects work

Activity/Assignment: The Elements of Design Worksheet is created to accompany this lesson video. Students are asked to observe their surroundings and identify the elements of design in their space and in photos of architecture.

Materials Required:

  • A printed copy of the Elements of Design Worksheet, or have students write and draw their answers on a separate piece of paper
  • Extra paper if needed
  • A drawing utensil

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • If students are watching this from home and are not able to print a copy of the worksheet, make sure they have instructions to write their answers on a separate piece of paper.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their answers with the rest of the class.

Questions? Contact Us

Kim Ruthardt Knowles
Associate Director, Architects in Schools
kim@af-oregon.org
503-317-7537

Candice Agahan
Education Program Manager
candice@af-oregon.org
503-542-3823

Application of Architectural Concepts

The following hands-on lessons and videos help students connect classroom subjects to real life situations. It allows them to take on the role of an architect or designer and discover the power and possibilities of design. They will be challenged to work through the design process, construct models, draw, and think about the impact their design decisions make on the world around them.

These videos serve as a good foundation for hands-on projects that can be completed from home or in the classroom. We recommend you assign or show these videos after students have had one or two sessions with a design/building professional or after they have completed a video lesson from the “Intro to Architecture” section above.

Expand the titles below to access each video lesson and pertinent information.

Featuring Alison Hoagland, architect at Mackenzie in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/kveHeVt-s9k
Video length: 12:07
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To gain a basic understanding of building structure and how structures stand
  • To understand the concepts of load, tension and compression within a structure
  • To develop an understanding of geometric structural forms
  • To learn to listen and follow directions

Activity/Assignment: This video leads students through a portion of the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.88) What Makes Structures Stand Up? During this lesson video, students are challenged to build structural shapes out of paper and load test them.

Materials Required:

  • Paper – construction paper or thicker paper preferred
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Books or something solid and heavy for the load test

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have had a brief introduction to architecture and design before showing this lesson. You can use one of the lesson videos from the Intro to Architecture section above to prepare them for these concepts, or do this lesson after a design/building professional has had at least one introductory session with students.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their shapes and how much weight their columns held with the rest of the class.

Extension:

  • Have students build more paper shapes from AiS Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.88) What Makes Structures Stand Up?
  • Assign “Design a Future City – Part 1 & 2” videos (see below) and have students use their shapes to build a model of their future city.

Featuring Alison Hoagland, architect at Mackenzie in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/RsEZJxGha2Q
Video Length: 24:06
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To gain a basic understanding of the process of designing cities and people who design them
  • To learn about Kevin Lynch’s annotation system as a tool for understanding city plans
  • To think critically about their own neighborhood and how it is laid out
  • To participate in a creative thinking process
  • To empathize and think about the needs of people living in the future

Activity/Assignment: Students will be challenged to think about cities of the future and develop ideas for their own future city by completing a writing/brainstorm exercise. This lesson has been adapted from the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.116) What Will Cities Look Like 25 Years from Now?

Materials Required:

  • A printed copy of the My Ideal Future City Worksheet, or have students write down their answers on a separate piece of paper
  • Extra paper
  • A writing utensil

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have been introduced to architectural concepts before showing this lesson. You can use one of the lesson videos from the Intro to Architecture section above to prepare them for this lesson, or do this lesson after a design/building professional has had at least one introductory session with students.
  • This video can be broken into two parts. Part 1 (0:00-14:41) includes an introduction to urban design and how cities get made, and Part 2 (14:42-24:06) teaches students about Kevin Lynch’s annotation system. You can show these two sections separately or have students take a quick break between the two sections.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • If students are watching this from home and are not able to print a copy of the My Ideal Future City Worksheet, make sure they have instructions to write their responses on a separate sheet of paper.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their future city ideas with the rest of the class.

Extension:

  • Have students apply Kevin Lynch’s “places” and annotations to a map of their own neighborhood or the neighborhood surrounding their school
  • Have students complete the following lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 2” (see next lesson below)

Featuring Alison Hoagland, architect at Mackenzie in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/bojQ66jRTAc
Video Length: 9:47
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To gain an understanding of why cities should be designed to be equitable and accessible for all
  • To learn about universal design, accessibility, collective value, intergenerational design and equity and inclusion in design
  • To understand how architects and designers have to continuously adapt to social changes like COVID-19 and some examples of these adaptations
  • To increase creativity through designing and drawing a city plan
  • To empathize and think about the needs of people living in the future
  • To learn to work with design criteria

Activity/Assignment: Building off of the last lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 1,” students will take their written ideas and turn them into a site plan of their future city. This lesson has been adapted from the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.116) What Will Cities Look Like 25 Years from Now?

Materials Required:

  • A completed My Ideal Future City Worksheet from “Design a Future City – Part 1” (see lesson above)
  • A printed copy of the Future City Design Criteria Worksheet, or have students write down their answers on a separate piece of paper
  • A large piece of white paper for the site plan – or students can tape multiple pieces of paper together
  • A writing utensil
  • Coloring utensils (colored pencils, markers, crayons, etc.)

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have completed the first part of this lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 1” (see lesson above) before doing this activity. They will be using the ideas they developed during that lesson to guide them through this activity.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • If students are watching this from home and are not able to print a copy of the Future City Design Criteria Worksheet, make sure they have instructions to write their responses on a separate sheet of paper.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their future city drawings with the rest of the class.
  • See example future city site plans created by students.

Extension: Have students complete the following lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 3” (see next lesson below)

Featuring Alison Hoagland, architect at Mackenzie in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/QVAtMEUcze0
Video Length: 1:23
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To apply learnings about universal design, accessibility, and equity into the design of a building or space
  • To increase creativity through designing and building a place in their future city
  • To empathize and think about the needs of people living in the future
  • To transform two-dimensional drawings and ideas into a three-dimensional form
  • To work through the design process

Activity/Assignment: Building off of the last lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 2” students will select a building or place in their future city and build a three-dimensional model of it. This lesson has been adapted from the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.116) What Will Cities Look Like 25 Years from Now?

Materials Required:

  • A completed My Ideal Future City Worksheet from “Design a Future City – Part 1” (see lesson above)
  • A completed Future City Design Criteria Worksheet from “Design a Future City – Part 2” (see lesson above)
  • A completed site plan from “Design a Future City – Part 2” (see lesson above)
  • Paper
  • Cardboard & other recycled materials
  • Crafting materials
  • Coloring utensils (colored pencils, markers, crayons, etc.)
  • Tape, glue or some other adhesive
  • Scissors
  • Any other art supplies students have for model making!

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have completed the first two parts of this lesson, “Design a Future City – Part 1 & Part 2” (see lessons above) before doing this activity. They will be using the ideas they developed during those lessons to guide them through this activity.
  • This video is quite short and simply offers encouragement to students before they begin building a model of their future city. You will want to make sure that students have identified what building or space they intend to design and build a model of as they begin this lesson. Some examples are an apartment building, a museum, a hospital, a park, a playground or a bridge.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time. We recommend you give students at least one hour to complete their models.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. Allow them to be creative with different materials and use what they have access to if they are building from home. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their future city models with the rest of the class.
  • See example future city models created by students.

Extension: Have students continue building models of places in their future city. Maybe some will be inspired to build their whole city, streets, river, parks and all!

Featuring Sina Meier, Architect at Opsis Architecture in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/h2oeDrVpAzk
Video length: 26:12
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To increase creativity through developing unique design solutions
  • To gain an understanding of relative scales and two and three-dimensional relationships
  • To learn how to empathize and serve a client’s needs
  • To understand a process for implementing a project
  • To learn to work with design criteria
  • To work through the design process

Activity/Assignment: This video leads students through the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.123) A Special Structure for a Special Client. During this activity, students are challenged to design and build a model of a structure for a special client.

Materials Required:

  • A printed copy of the Design Development Sheet or have students write down their answers and draw on separate pieces of paper
  • One Client Slip per student
  • Paper
  • A writing utensil
  • Coloring utensils (colored pencils, markers, crayons, etc.)
  • Recycled materials or anything students can use to build models
  • Scissors
  • Tape or glue

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have been introduced to architectural concepts before showing this lesson. You can use one of the lesson videos from the Intro to Architecture section above to prepare them for this lesson, or do this lesson after a design/building professional has had at least one introductory session with students.
  • Before you begin the lesson, take a look at the Client Slips and assign a client to each student.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time.
  • This video can be broken into two parts. Part 1 (0:00-15:37) includes questions 1-4 on the Design Development Sheet, and Part 2 (15:38-26:12) includes building a model and questions 5-6 on the Design Development Sheet.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link.
  • If students are watching this from home and are not able to print a copy of the Design Development Sheet, make sure they have instructions to write and draw on a separate sheet of paper.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their projects with the rest of the class.
  • See a completed project example for this lesson.

Extension: Have students draw a floor plan or elevation of their structure on free 3D software like Google SketchUp or Tinkercad

Featuring Eric Gewirtz, Architect at Opsis Architecture in Portland, Oregon

Shareable Video Link: youtu.be/BBLAe7qNheA
Video length: 8:53
Closed captions available

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand a brief history of geodesic domes and learn about architect Buckminster Fuller
  • To identify forces of tension and compression
  • To understand the strength of triangles and how they distribute weight
  • To have an increased awareness of geometric shapes and be able to identify them
  • To learn to follow directions

Activity/Assignment: This video leads students through the Architects in Schools Curriculum Guide lesson: (4.80) Building a Geodesic Dome. During this lesson, students will learn a brief history of geodesic domes and will follow the steps to build their own miniature geodesic dome.

Materials Required:

  • Marshmallows, gummy bears, gumdrop candies or something of similar size and texture
  • Toothpicks
  • Optional step-by-step guide for students completing this lesson outside of class hours

How to prep students for this lesson:

  • Make sure students have been introduced to architectural concepts before showing this lesson. You can use one of the lesson videos from the Intro to Architecture section above to prepare them for this lesson, or do this lesson after a design/building professional has had at least one introductory session with students.
  • We recommend the teacher or design/building professional build a dome ahead of time so you can have an example to show and will be prepared to lead students through the process. If you are teaching this lesson virtually, we recommend you make your own geodesic dome alongside the students so they can see each step.
  • Decide whether you want to show the video to students all at once and complete the activity as a class, or if you want to assign the video and activity for students to complete on their own time. Students in 3rd grade and younger may need more assistance completing this activity and may benefit from completing this activity as a class.
  • Make sure students have access to all the materials listed above as they watch the video. If they are completing the assignment outside of class hours, also be sure to send them the video link. This step-by-step guide will also be helpful to students completing this activity on their own outside of class hours.
  • After the assignment is over, have students share their geodesic domes with the rest of the class.
  • See example geodesic domes created by students

Extension: Have students load test their geodesic domes by placing a plate on top of their dome and slowly adding weight, such as coins, until it shows signs of structural failure.

Looking for ways to implement these videos into your residency? Check out our pre-planned residency examples